What is Macular Degeneration

What is Macular Degeneration

The eye can be compared to a camera. Both, the camera and the eye, gather light and transform it into a picture that we see. They both focus the incoming light with the help of a lens. The very back of a human eye is layered with a light sensitive tissue called retina. Retina turns light into electrical signals, and then sends these electrical signals through the optic nerve to the brain, where they are translated into the images we see. The retina’s central portion, known as the macula, is responsible for focusing central vision in the eye, and it controls our ability to read, drive a car, recognize faces or colors, and see objects in fine detail.

Macular Degeneration is caused by the deterioration of the macula, and at present, is considered an incurable eye disease, because it causes a permanent damage. Macular Degeneration by itself does not lead to complete blindness, with no ability to see. However, the loss of central vision in Macular Degeneration can interfere with simple everyday activities. The blurred area may grow larger or you may develop blank spots in your central vision. Objects also may not appear to be as bright as they used to be.

In some cases, Macular Degeneration advances so slowly that vision loss does not occur for a long time. In others, the disease progresses faster and may lead to a loss of vision in one or both eyes.